Chinese Sword (nji-109)

 

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” THIS IS THE FIRST OF A SERIES OF SWORDS THAT WILL BE FEATURED IN THE ” FEATURED WEAPON SECTION OF KUNG FU TAI CHI MAGAZINE. THIS PARTICULAR SWORD IS CURRENTLY SPOT LIGHTED IN THE MARCH/APRIL ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE.”

NIUWEIDA / OXTAIL SABER

Cutting edge 29 ½”
Overall in scabbard 38”

This sword is being offered for a short time only. As collectors of Chinese arms know most of these weapons from China were seized and or destroyed in the past and are becoming very hard to find. This sword in particular was acquired from the Norton Flea Market over 30 years ago. The blade is most likely from the late 19 Century . It is very hard to date Chinese swords unless it still retains the original mountings such as this. Most Chinese blades are not signed or dated and dating can be a task. Opinions can vary from the many experts.

This Dao was originally found at the Norton Flea Market In Norton, Ma. During the 1980’s. The owner of the sword where found claimed it was given to his wife’s great-uncle at the turn of the Century from the Chinese government. He was a Consulate or Ambassador to China and leaving his post. A great farewell gift!

THE OWNER NOW:
This blade is not of the soft flexible training steel one usually finds in more recent blades but of a hardened battle type of steel. Cuts in the steel from blade blocks can be found on  the blade!

The following is an excerpt from Philip Tom and Peter Dekker of Mandarin Mansion regarding this style of sword:

FROM PETER DEKKER:

“This is an oxtail saber or niuweidao. This type with black lacquered, wire-wrapped scabbard is usually associated with the late 19th to early 20th century. This is the time where traditional Chinese martial arts started to re-invent themselves into ever more showy or health-focused practices. This example is in pretty good state of preservation, most of them are in far worse condition. The blade is interesting, usually you see these with two grooves, a wide one with a narrower one above that. This example has three grooves of equal width, a somewhat rarer configuration.”

FROM PHILIP TOM IN ADDENDUM TO:

“The 3 groove format is a distinct subtype although the dual wide/narrow is more common.  The triple style seems derived from Solingen export blades, both straight and curved , that were sold in Asia during the 18th-19th centuries, particularly in India and Batavia.  Not many reached the Chinese market though the stylistic influence may have come in via an expat Chinese living in SE Asia during the late Qing Dynasty.”

This sword is on consignment.
Special Sale Price
Sold
On Hold

Asking price: $3,600.00

(shipping and insurance included)
Email us if your interested in this item and remember to include the order number for this item: fss-633.
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