Signed shin-gunto (fss-741)

Signed shin-gunto (fss-741)

Signed shin-gunto (fss-741)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a WWII era sword made for the war effort. The mounts are referred to as Shingunto and looks to have seen some use as well as the blade . The sword is signed but is difficult to make out and needs further examination on the signature.  There are many smiths making swords for the military that signed differently.  This is just one example of a authentic WWII sword. There appears to be a thick suguha-midare style hamon as well as an arsenal stamp on the tang. The sword is in relativly good condition and shows the wear and tear from being on the battlefield. A perfect blade for a WWII era Japanese sword collector. The blade comes mounted in a green lacquered saya with a tassel in very good condition. Shin-gunto, army officers swords, are the most common style of sword mountings from the World War II era. There is an enormous difference in quality of both blades and mounts of this period. Many, perhaps most, of the blades found in shin-gunto mounts are NOT traditionally made swords. Many are machine made and therefore are of interest as military collectables. The sword is 26 1/4″ and a fine example of a WWII military sword. These swords were sometimes found in civilian mounts used for Japanese sword practice. Mei: Difficult to read (needs more research) Date: WWII Era Nagasa: 26-1/4 inches Sori: 15.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 31.1 mm Width at the yokote: 22.6 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 7.5 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori Nakago: Ubu Kitae: muji Hamon: Oil tempered Midare Boshi: Maru Condition: WWII polish Click to Enlarge Image Click to Enlarge...
NCO shin-gunto (fss-740)

NCO shin-gunto (fss-740)

NCO shin-gunto (fss-740)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a WWII era sword made in the later part of the war. The sword is in fair condition and the mounts are standard NCO style mounts. a good sword for the WWII era Japanese sword collector.  Shin-gunto, army officers swords, are the most common style of sword mountings from the World War II era. There is an enormous difference in quality of both blades and mounts of this period. Many, perhaps most, of the blades found in shin-gunto mounts are not traditionally made swords. Many are machine made or old tempered and therefore are of interest only as military collectables. Some blades made during the war period were handmade but not by traditional methods. Excerpt from Rich Steins site: NCO SHIN-GUNTOPrior to 1945, NCO shin-gunto, non-commissioned officers swords, have all metal tsukas (handles) made to resemble the traditionally cloth wrapped shin-gunto swords. The first model had an unpainted copper hilt. On later models the hilts were made of aluminum and painted to resemble the lacing (ito) on officer’s shin-gunto swords. These swords will have serial numbers on their blades and are ALL machine made, without exception. The serial numbers are simple assembly or manufacturing numbers; they are not serial numbers of blades as issued to specific soldiers. If the sword is all original, the serial numbers on the blade, tsuba, saya and all other parts should match. In 1945, the NCO sword was changed to a simple wooden hilt with incised cross-hatching (no same’ or ito) and plain, black painted iron mounts and a light brown to tan...
Taro Kanehiro (fss-739)

Taro Kanehiro (fss-739)

Taro Kanehiro (fss-739)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This Shinsakuto is a beautiful traditionally made sword. With almost a 30″ Nagasa and custom mountings this is a sword to admire. This blade was created to use for training and also for cutting in the traditional Martial Arts as well as for a collector of Shinsakuto blades. A gunome hamon with Bohi adds to the lightness and balance of this sword as well as the aesthetic quality of the blade. The Koshirae is very appealing and not meant to be flashy.  Adorned with strirated design Fuchi / Kashira and menuki of either catfish or tadpole motif.. The handle wrap is finished in blue silk Ito. There is an iron tsuba that also accentuates the mountings. The Saya is in a Black lacquered finish. This sword perfect for training in Iaido . This blade was made of Tamahagane and using the traditional methods, folded and clay tempered, water quenched. And is a true Japanese sword. This sword is signed: “Bushido - Higo no Kuni Yatsushiro-ju Akamatsu Taro Kanehiro saku” (武士道・肥後國赤松太郎兼祐作) “Jika seitetsu o motte kore o kitau” (以自家製鉄鍛之) - “Forged with home-made steel” “Kinoe-umadoshi hachigatsu kichijitsu” (甲午年八月吉日) - “On a lucky day in August in the year of the horse (2014)” Mei: “Bushido - Higo no Kuni Yatsushiro-ju Akamatsu Taro Kanehiro saku” (武士道・肥後國赤松太郎兼祐作) “Jika seitetsu o motte kore o kitau” (以自家製鉄鍛之) - “Forged with home-made steel” “Kinoe-umadoshi hachigatsu kichijitsu” (甲午年八月吉日) - “On a lucky day in August in the year of the horse (2014)” Nagasa: 29 inches Sori: 16.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 33.5 mm Width at the yokote: 24.6 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.6 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori...
Tachibana Kunihide (fss-738)

Tachibana Kunihide (fss-738)

Tachibana Kunihide (fss-738)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful Shinshinto Katana, this sword is reminiscent of much earlier Soshu style work. At first glance this blade reminds one of the majestic blades of the finest Soshu Den smiths. A long, wide sword attributed to Kunihide with a extremely active and swirling hamon. Even the hamon shows hamon hada or a grain pattern within the yakiba.  At 29-1/2 ” this blade is an incredible one of a kind piece. The hada is incredibly clear and visible and appears to be a Masame with itame, there is  masame nagare . There is a longish wavy kissaki and very active. There is ji nie all over. The hamon is a large notare gunome and truly spectacular which is in a pristine polish.  A fantastic sword with much to enjoy and appreciate. The hamon has a 3d like appearance with almost every activity that is imaginable. You can find kinsugi, sunagashi, ashi, yo and chikei can be found in the hada. The kissaki is a long O-kissaki with a very active boshi filled with sunagashi. About the smith: KUNIHIDE (国秀), Tenpō (天保, 1830-1844), Kōzuke – “Jōshū Annaka-jū Enryūshi Tachibana Kunihide” (上州安中住円龍子橘国秀), “Tachibana Enryūshi Kunihide saku” (立花円龍子国秀作), “Sōshū Kamakura-jū Tachibana Kunihide” (相州鎌倉住橘国秀), “Enryūshi Kunihide saku” (円龍子国秀作), real name Tachibana Hayato (橘隼人), student of Ikkansai Yoshihiro (一貫斎義弘), he worked for the Annaka fief (安中藩) of Kōzuke province, during the Tenpō he worked temporarily also in Echigo, between Kaei (嘉永, 1848-1854) and Bunkyū (文久, 1861-1864) he moved eventually to Kamakura, most of his blades have a magnificent sugata with a wide mihaba and an elongated kissaki, the jigane is an ō-itame...
Naminohira Daito (fss-737)

Naminohira Daito (fss-737)

Naminohira Daito (fss-737)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful strongly curved koto sword attributed to the Naminohira group of swordsmiths. The hada/grain pattern is Masame with itama and Shirake utsuri can be seen. The hamon is sugu-ha with ashi and sunagashi, there is nijuba which can be seen also. The koshirae saya is finished in a black lacquer.The  Tsuka ito is green. There are Uma blossom design in iron on the fuchi kashira finished in the taka-bori style.. the tsuba is iron sukashi also with Uma blossoms After the Kamakura period (1185-1333) on through the Edo period (1615-1868), the name of Naminohira was passed down from generation to generation of sword makers who lived in Naminohira, Satsuma Province (the southern outskirts of present-day Kagoshima City). For those who love to sail or in the Navy, this sword holds very special significance. ‘Nami’ means ‘wave‘, hira means ‘flat‘. This translates to “sail on calm seas“. Naminohira swords made by Satsuma swordsmiths were very popular among the Japanese Imperial Navy for the swords brought with them a positive omen. In general Naminohira blades are very rare, so this is a unique find. As history tells us, during the Edo Period (1603-1868) the ruling Tokugawa family kept Japan in virtual isolation from foreign visitors for two and a half centuries. Interestingly enough, the Satsuma area had gates of their own, both to those outside their land in Kyushu AND to the outside world. Essentially only those born in Satsuma lived in Satsuma. To defend their unique culture and maintain their way of life, Satsuma developed a fierce...