MINO KANENAKA (fss-744)

MINO KANENAKA (fss-744)

MINO KANENAKA (fss-744)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a very nice wakazashi and is a very sound and healthy blade and appears to be in an older koto style. The kissaki is longish and approaching O-kissaki status.  The blade is wide and has a beautiful curvature that reminds one of the old mino school.  The quality of the sword is also very good.  The hamon is bright and has very good activity.  The hada is milky looking and is forged well with much ji-nie and shirake appears.  The hamon is frosted with nie and the hada is well forged with some mokume and itame. There is profuse ara-nie and ji-nie. This sword was attributed to Mino Kanenaka. There were many Kanenaka smiths working at this time but this sword is of a distinct quality. The hamon is gunome midare in notare with much activity and plenty of nie with nioi. The hada is an itame/mokume mix with some masame. This is a koto muramachi wakazashi made back in the 1500’s by Kanenaka a smith from the Seki school lineage. The hamon is notare based gunome and has very good quality hatarai/activity. The hamon is very healthy for such an older piece. The hada is also well forged and is very active and has very nice masame in places. Seki school blades like this were known to be very reliable and sharp. This wakazashi comes in shirasaya with papers attesting to quality and maker. There is a silver foil habaki also. The sword comes in a good polish. KANENAKA (兼仲), Eiroku (永禄, 1558-1570), Mino – “Kanenaka” (兼仲), “Nōshū Seki-jū Kanenaka” (濃州関住兼仲), Zenjō school, itame mixed with masame...
Jumyo wakazashi (fss-743)

Jumyo wakazashi (fss-743)

Jumyo wakazashi (fss-743)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale The Jumyo name has its origins from Yamato in Nara prefecture and moved to Mino province in Gifu prefecture in the Kamakura period (1185-1333). The tradition continued until the end of the Edo period in 1868.The name, Jumyo, means life span or longevity.  Their swords were prized as celebrated gifts to Daimyo families amongst the Samurai society.  This is an exquisite ko- wakazashi.  The finer aspects of this koshirae are very unique.  The tsuba/guard is made of shakudo with a dragon themed rim and tsukashi kirimon cutout.  Most of the fittings are also shakudo.  The saya/scabbard is made in a unique style. The lacquer is very precious with kojiri made of silver.  The tsukamaki or silk handle wrapping shows a beautiful aged appearance and coloration.  We do not recommend changing it.  The overall condition is excellent with some minor age oriented damage, and is a splendid work of art in itself.  The blade is also very well made and flawless.  It is in a fresh polish and the hada and hamon can truly be appreciated and enjoyed.   The hamon is nioi based in general and has a very controlled hamon in a sugu-ba style.  It  is subdued with minute chikei to be found  and is opulent in finish with ji-nie.  The sword should be submitted to  shinsa in the future to add to its overall value. ” A NOTE ON THE DRAGON THEME ” Many Chinese believed the dragon held, or at least chased, the sun, and many drawings depict this as a flaming red ball. However, over the...
Naminohira Daito (fss-737)

Naminohira Daito (fss-737)

Naminohira Daito (fss-737)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A beautiful strongly curved koto sword attributed to the Naminohira group of swordsmiths. The hada/grain pattern is Masame with itama and Shirake utsuri can be seen. The hamon is sugu-ha with ashi and sunagashi, there is nijuba which can be seen also. The koshirae saya is finished in a black lacquer.The  Tsuka ito is green. There are Uma blossom design in iron on the fuchi kashira finished in the taka-bori style.. the tsuba is iron sukashi also with Uma blossoms After the Kamakura period (1185-1333) on through the Edo period (1615-1868), the name of Naminohira was passed down from generation to generation of sword makers who lived in Naminohira, Satsuma Province (the southern outskirts of present-day Kagoshima City). For those who love to sail or in the Navy, this sword holds very special significance. ‘Nami’ means ‘wave‘, hira means ‘flat‘. This translates to “sail on calm seas“. Naminohira swords made by Satsuma swordsmiths were very popular among the Japanese Imperial Navy for the swords brought with them a positive omen. In general Naminohira blades are very rare, so this is a unique find. As history tells us, during the Edo Period (1603-1868) the ruling Tokugawa family kept Japan in virtual isolation from foreign visitors for two and a half centuries. Interestingly enough, the Satsuma area had gates of their own, both to those outside their land in Kyushu AND to the outside world. Essentially only those born in Satsuma lived in Satsuma. To defend their unique culture and maintain their way of life, Satsuma developed a fierce...
Yamato Masanori (fss-733)

Yamato Masanori (fss-733)

Yamato Masanori (fss-733)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale One of the true masters of Keicho Shinto. This smith can be found in most books and especially the ” Masters of Keicho Shinto by Markus Sesko “.. There is an outstanding gunome midare hamon. The hamon has an abundant amount of hataraki/activity and in a fresh polish will stand out beautifully. There are many tobyaki/yubashiri above the hamon. The hada is very clear and has a milky appearance and is well forged.  This is mounted in shirasaya with silver rain storm style habaki.   This sword is from an old collection and is papered to Den Masanori. Masanori was from the Yamada (山田) family and signed his name in early years with the characters (正法). He came originally from Miyatsu (宮津) in Tango province and was a late smith of the lineage of SanjōYoshinori (吉則). Via a stopover in Yamashiro, he moved to Fukui (福井) in Echizen province where he became a student of Kanenori (兼法). We know date signatures from the 13th year of Keichō(1608) to the fourth year of Keian (慶安, 1651). He had one successor who moved later to Edo. Although Masanori was mostly active somewhat later than Keichō, his early works are nevertheless interpreted in Keichō-shintōstyle. We can see a strong resemblance to Mino, or to be precise to Sue-Seki and Kanefusa (兼房) in his works, but certain blades remind of Hizen Tadahiro, Echizen Yasutsugu, or of the Horikawa school. A fine example of the older style blades this sword is polished and mounted in shirasaya “. A fresh polish would greatly enhance the value of the...
Chinese sword (nji 112)

Chinese sword (nji 112)

Chinese sword (nji 112)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale Click to Enlarge Image ” THIS IS ONE OF A SERIES OF SWORDS THAT WILL BE FEATURED IN THE ” FEATURED WEAPON SECTION OF KUNG FU TAI CHI MAGAZINE.” This sword is being offered for a short time only. As collectors of Chinese arms know most of these weapons from China were seized and or destroyed in the past and are becoming very hard to find. This sword in particular was acquired from a West coast dealer over 25 years ago. The blade is most likely from the mid 18 Century to the mid 19th Century, maybe older. It is very hard to date Chinese swords unless it still retains the original mountings. Most Chinese blades are not signed or dated and dating can be a task. Opinions can vary from the many experts. We were told that this blade is a true seven star sword blade and the brass that is left representing the stars were original and not added at a later date mainly due to the fact that each star is connected by the remnants of a wavy inlay which connects each star. This was usually only found on original seven star blades. The later brass additions on other blades were just usually round inlays of similar dimension and added at a later date. This is a monster to behold and wield. The blade is hand forged and the laminating patterns and tempered edge are can be seen throughout. The saya was made from rosewood we believe as well as the handle which is intricately hand carved with Dragons which...