Taro Kanehiro (fss-739)

Taro Kanehiro (fss-739)

Taro Kanehiro (fss-739)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This Shinsakuto is a beautiful traditionally made sword. With almost a 30″ Nagasa and custom mountings this is a sword to admire. This blade was created to use for training and also for cutting in the traditional Martial Arts as well as for a collector of Shinsakuto blades. A gunome hamon with Bohi adds to the lightness and balance of this sword as well as the aesthetic quality of the blade. The Koshirae is very appealing and not meant to be flashy.  Adorned with strirated design Fuchi / Kashira and menuki of either catfish or tadpole motif.. The handle wrap is finished in blue silk Ito. There is an iron tsuba that also accentuates the mountings. The Saya is in a Black lacquered finish. This sword perfect for training in Iaido . This blade was made of Tamahagane and using the traditional methods, folded and clay tempered, water quenched. And is a true Japanese sword. This sword is signed: “Bushido - Higo no Kuni Yatsushiro-ju Akamatsu Taro Kanehiro saku” (武士道・肥後國赤松太郎兼祐作) “Jika seitetsu o motte kore o kitau” (以自家製鉄鍛之) - “Forged with home-made steel” “Kinoe-umadoshi hachigatsu kichijitsu” (甲午年八月吉日) - “On a lucky day in August in the year of the horse (2014)” Mei: “Bushido - Higo no Kuni Yatsushiro-ju Akamatsu Taro Kanehiro saku” (武士道・肥後國赤松太郎兼祐作) “Jika seitetsu o motte kore o kitau” (以自家製鉄鍛之) - “Forged with home-made steel” “Kinoe-umadoshi hachigatsu kichijitsu” (甲午年八月吉日) - “On a lucky day in August in the year of the horse (2014)” Nagasa: 29 inches Sori: 16.0 mm Width at the ha-machi: 33.5 mm Width at the yokote: 24.6 mm Thickness at the mune-machi: 6.6 mm Construction: Shinogi zukuri Mune: Iori...
Hôjôji Sadakuni (fss-736)

Hôjôji Sadakuni (fss-736)

Hôjôji Sadakuni (fss-736)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This is a very interesting katana from the Shinto period which reminds one of the Mino or Bizen tradition of the late koto era. It is in a very nice polish.  The overall sugata of this sword is impressive and the hamon is loaded with activity.  The hamon contains plentiful nie and a gunome / choji midare. Sunagashi, Kinsuji and Ji-nie can be found.  The hada has an itame / mokume mix and with some areas of O- hada mixed in.  The blade has some course areas that are common for swords of this age.  This blade comes with mountings.  The furniture of the koshirae are made of iron and in good condition. The Tsuba is an owari style with gold design and the fuchi and kashira are a matching koi motif and in iron. The tsuba is also iron and pierced as well. The menuki are of seashells. The Sageo and Ito are black and the saya lacquer is finished in red with a swirling style finish. Note the same with gold in the lacquer also. The blade is a  long o-suriage sword and a shinto era piece. The kissaki is longish and ko-maru boshi  not quite kaen. There is a gentle sori. The saya is of a red lacquer and is completely restored to keep the polish of the sword in good condition.  The blade is mumei and the habaki is a gold foil and in an arabesque finish pattern.  This sword is a wonderful package by a great school. Hojoji Sadakuni is listed as a 60 pt. smith in Hawley’s. Mei: Mumei, attributed to Hôjôji Sadakuni Date: Edo (1600’s-1700’s) Nagasa: 27-7/8 inches Sori: 6.2 mm Width at the ha-machi: 30.1 mm...
Yokoyama Sukemune (fss-732)

Yokoyama Sukemune (fss-732)

Yokoyama Sukemune (fss-732)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale The swordsmith and signature: Sukemune (祐宗) was a smith of the bakumatsu era Yokoyama Bizen School. It is said that he originally came from Ise province and that has studied with Yokoyama Sukeharu (祐春) who was active between Tenpô (1830-1844) and Ansei (1854-1860) and who counted himself as 56th generation Tomonari. However, there is also the tradition that he studied with one of the two generations Yokoyama Sukenaga (祐永). The 1st generation Sukenaga counted himself as 56th, and the 2nd generation as 57th generation Tomonari. However, it is possible that Sukemune learned from all of these Yokoyama Bizen masters. There exists a blade by Sukemune which he made in Keiô three (1867) in the vicinity of the Tenryûgawa (天竜川) in Shinano province, present-day Nagano Prefecture. This blade is signed with the supplement Kômeishi (高鳴子) which seems to have been Sukemune’s gô. Sukemune counted himself as 58th generation Tomonari but so did the Yokoyama Bizen smiths Sukeyoshi (祐義) and Sukekane (祐包). The supplement in the signature says that the blade was made for a certain Fujiwara Jinzaemon (藤原陣左衛門) from the Sekiguchi Gyokushin ryû. Unfortunately, we were not able to find anything on the person Jinzaemon himself. The Sekiguchi Gyokushin ryû is a kenjutsu and iaijutsu school that goes back to Satô Yûta (佐藤雄太) (also listed as Satô Gondayû, 佐藤権太夫) who was a samurai of the Tokushima fief in Awa province who studied kenjutsu with the Heki family which were elders of the Okayama fief of Bizen province. The Sekiguchi Gyokushin ryû was then taught by Satô’s...
Mino Kanetomo (fss-731)

Mino Kanetomo (fss-731)

Mino Kanetomo (fss-731)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale A fine example of the older Mino style blades this sword was shortened at the machi to true uchikatana size though still retains the original mei of “ Kane Tomo Saku “. Uchikatana were mainly used in one handed fighting styles which were prolific during the Muramachi and early Edo period . The hamon is a wonderfully active Gunome midare with a hada of itame. Many hataraki can be seen within the hamon. There are several courser areas as pointed out in the pictures. The blade appears ubu but shortened a little bit at the machi but the signature is fully intact. There are 3 holes in the tang from prior mountings, A hira-zukiri sword of this length is most prized by the collector . A sword such as this  polished shows the true workmanship of the steel from side to side. The koshirae is a true fit to the blade and is in the Uchikatana style. The Sukashi style tsuba and stone like texture of the fuchi kashira is very appealing though not old. The Tsuka-Ito is blue with black sageo. During the twelfth century Uchigatana started to be used and by the Muromachi Period approximately 1336 to 1573 the uchigatana began to rival the tachi as the sword of choice by warriors. Unlike the tachi, the uchigatana was worn edge-up in the belt,  this and usually being slightly smaller than the tachi was the main difference between the tachi and the uchigatana.  Since it is worn differently, the engraved words on the sword are also opposite to...
Mito Sukemitsu (fss-730)

Mito Sukemitsu (fss-730)

Mito Sukemitsu (fss-730)   New Item   Available   Sold On Hold Special Sale This exceptionally long Yokoyama blade was forged by Sukemitsu and is very well made.  The hamon is abundant with Hataraki/activaty and is beautiful as can be seen in the photo’s.  Its nie based gunome midare mixed with ashi.  There is active streaks of sunagashi and kinsuji throughout the blade.  It also has very nice mune yaki.  The hada is tightly forged in itame and has a rich appearance with much jinie.  The shape of the sword is very elegant and well balanced. The Yokohama swordsmiths were very famous and respected for there work.  This fine sword comes with original mounts that are of very good quality.  The scabbard/saya is very sound and has no damages.  The overall look of the mounts adds greatly to this swords value.  Papered by the NBTHK  attesting to the smith, age and quality of this blade.  A complete sword mounted, polished and papered. An excerpt from an article by Craig Bird: ” Shinto and Shin-Shinto Yokoyama School The Shinto Yokoyama-den was founded by the Osafune school smith Kozuke Daijo Sukesada who made blades with a distinct and rich choji pattern. Next to Kozuke Daijo, the best known Yokoyama kaji is Yokoyama Sukenaga (circa Tenpo). This school made blades of nioi hamon reminiscent of Koto times relying on many varieties of choji. These blades display koshi-hiraki midare, gunome, tight nioi-guchi, sunagashi and kinsuji. Other Shinto and Shin-Shinto era kaji also used the Bizen choji as trademark for their work. Such smiths included Naka Kawachi Kunisuke, Ishido-den, Taikei Naotane, as well as many...